02 December 2008

North Wall Kit List (Summer)

Category: Systems

A few weeks ago I came across a post on UK Climbing about what to take on the Walker Spur on the Grande Jorasses. The list was pretty complete, and caused quite a response as other climbers picked at it, saying what items should be removed, and which should remain. In response I thought I’d do my own, as I thought it could be both a guide to those who are unsure about what to take, and also as a tick list when working out what you may have forgotten.

I’ve never climbed the walker spur, but this list is designed for that kind of route; namely long, multi day, moderate to high temperatures (30 to -5) and with short sections of hard climbing (HVS), but with lots of fixed gear. Like the walker this kit list is based on the expectation that very little snow and ice climbing will be encountered.

Looking at my own kit list I can see that it contradicts quite a few things that are written elsewhere on this site, which may confuse some people. Yet the most important aspect of gear choice is to remain flexible in your thinking, and so try new things or rediscover old ways of doing things that now seem to make more sense. This means things like trying a more trad layering system sometimes, trying plastic boots instead of leather, not using your super techy hanging stove, but something simpler. This approach will keep you learning and keep climbing fun, and more importantly the outcome unknown.

CLOTHES TO WEAR

LIGHTWEIGHT CLIMBING BOOTS

These should be light enough to be easily carried in your rucksack (ideally under 2 kg), yet be warm enough for cold days, and stiff and sensitive enough for both moderate rock climbing and ice climbing. Ideally you should be able to feel comfortable leading 2 grades below your normal grade in these boots (using some French free), meaning a HVS leader should be happy leading VD (UIAA IV).

SOCKS AND LINERS

Go for a good quality mountaineering sock with a high wool content. Length isn’t that crucial, but longer socks can be pulled up when it gets cold, but shorter socks will be cooler.

SHORT GAITERS

Make sure they fit well before departing.

SCHOLLER PANTS

These should fit well and not be too baggy (especially at the ankle as you’re not wearing full length gaiters). Having a pair with some kind of gator at the bottom is a good idea when you’re post holing to your route. Try and make sure they have been tumble dried before you go so as to improve their DWR.

WOOL BOXERS/SHORTS

Won’t smell, can be worn as shorts on the approach/decent, will also reduce chaffing.

LONG SLEEVED BASE LAYER TOP

This should be lightweight, with long sleeves, zip neck, and a dark colour. This is not for warmth, but to keep the sun off your skin.

WIND TOP

This would be a very lightweight hooded pertex top, worn over the base layer.

BASE BALL CAP

This should be very lightweight (Patagonia), and have Velcro tabs on the back to attach a piece of material French Foreign Legion style.

GLOVES

Power stretch

BUFF

GLACIER GLASSES + CORD

Nothing to fancy, but they need to fit well and be factor 4.

SMALL LIGHTWEIGHT WATCH

Can be worn around the neck on cord or on wrist (needs to be slim profile on wrist if hand jamming)

CLOTHES (EXTRAS)

PILE JACKET

This would be a Patagonia R2 style jacket, which may have the edge on micro puff style jackets for moisture control on potentially hot (stop and go) climbs. It can also be warn next to the skin (Buffalo style) when “wet warmth” is needed. A half zip jacket is good as it will be worn with a harness a lot. This fleece should be modified by adding wrist overs (made from the cuffs of an old thin fleece),and if it’s short then extend the hem so it tucks well into a harness.

WATERPROOF TOP AND BOTTOMS

These should be as light and simple as possible. They may get damaged, but you should be prepared to patch them up.

SYNTHETIC BELAY/BIVY/STORM JACKET

This would be a lightweight and hooded synthetic jacket (Patagonia micro puff jacket), that would be worn at night in my bag, for very long belays, in a storm. This might replace my fleece jacket if conditions where warm.

DRYTOOL STYLE GLOVES

LIGHTWEIGHT MITTS

These should be as light as possible, but still be able to handle full storms. My favourites are Buffalo mitts (79g), which I’ve used alone down to -30oC! Add a shock cord retainer so they can’t be dropped.

BALACLAVA

Go for something that fits well. My favourite fabrics are grit style fleece (R1) or Powerstrtetch.

SPARE SOCKS (optional)

These can be used as mitts as well, and should be placed in a plastic bag.

ROCK BOOTS

These should be fitted with your big socks for moderate climbs, and be comfortable enough to wear all day. Use wax on them to help to reduce wetting out. They should be compatible with you gaiters.

LEGGINGS (optional)

These are worn when rock climbing in cold conditions to keep your feet warmer (more important when wearing thinner socks in your boots), and are either old socks with the toe cut out, or home made from fleece (Powerstretch).

HARDWEAR

AXE

On something like the Walker I might take a pair of very light technical tools (one for each climber), meaning hard mixed climbing could be achieved (crucial if you get verglas or have to climb in a storm) by the leader (the second should be able to cope on a tight rope). This also gives you a hammer which can be used for testing/resetting pegs on a descent. My choice would be a set of leashless Petzl AZTAR EX P for this kind of climb, as they would be light (500g) but able to handle any technical terrain (snow, ice or mixed).

CRAMPONS

For this type of climb I’d go for pair of superlight alloy crampons, perhaps switching to a pair of steel 12 points later in the season if I thought I might encounter mixed climbing.

HARNESS

Lightest harness I could find. At the moment this would be a Petzl HIRUNDOS (fixed legs)

Helmet + HEADTORCH

You need something lightweight but able to cope with both rock and climber falls. On a route like the walker I’d probably go for Petzl Meteor III, although a Petzl Elios would make more sense. My headtorch would be fixed to the helmet for the whole climb so I couldn’t be caught out, and for summer alpine climbing this would be a Petzl Tikka XP or new Petzl Adapt system (not tested yet) fitted with new batteries.

  • MAGIC PLATE + I HMS 1+ SMALL SCREWGATE
  • 2 PRUSSIKS LARKS FOOTED TO THE BACK OF MY HARNESS
  • 2 60M 8MM HALF ROPES
  • 1-6 SUPERLIGHT ROCKS
  • 7-10 OF NUTS (all on one krab)
  • 3-8 ROCKCENTRIC + KRAB*
  • 8 8mm and 10mm 60CM SLINGS + 16 KRABS
  • These would be made into exstenders
  • 2 60cm SNAKE SLINGS + 2 KRABS
  • 1 120cm SNAKE SLING + 1 KRAB
  • 1 CORDELLETE
  • 1 ROPE MAN MK1
  • 1 LARGE HMS
  • 2 DMM REVOLVERS

BIVY GEAR

LIGHTWEIGHT SLEEPING BAG

This would either be:-

A home made synthetic half bag (details on how to make one coming soon), that would have a water resistant outer, no zip and a built in cowl.

A 300 grams down bag (PHD), or 1 season synthetic that would be used as a blanket over both climbers.

The importance of a having a sleeping bag (rather than just going without), is that you’ll feel more able to push on when time isn’t on your side, plus you stand a better chance at getting some sleep!

2 PERSON BOOTHY BAG

This probably needs to be home made as there are no commercially available bags that suit this type of climbing. Another option is to use a lightweight tarp (Steve House style).

  • OPTIMUS CRUX
  • TITANIUM PAN/MUG
  • FOIL WINDSHEILD
  • 2 LIGHTERS
  • 1xSPOON (WITH CORD ATTACHED)
  • 3O LITRE SACK (sub 500 grams) + PLASTIC/DRY BAG
  • 3 SMALL GAS CANISTERS Having more smaller canisters means if one is damaged you still have a gas supply.
  • MINIMAL FIRST AID KIT*

    Pain killers, finger tape, sanitary towel in plastic zip lock

    • LOO PAPER (in bag)
    • 3 PIECE KARIMATT STORED IN A SLEEVE IN SACK
    • 2 LITRE PLATYPUS
    • PENCIL WITH DUCTED TAPE RAPPED AROUND IT
    • MOBILE PHONE (WITH EMERGENCY NUMBER INSIDE)
    • TRASH BAG For you and others trash
    • TOPOS, DESCENT DESCRIPTION IN BAG
    • SECTION OF MAP (LAMINATED)
    • SMALL COMPASS
    • EAR PLUGS
    • SUN CREAM
    • PEN KNIFE
    • 1x NEEDLE AND THREAD
    • 4x ZIP TIES
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Andy Kirkpatrick

Andrew Kirkpatrick is a British mountaineer, author, motivational speaker and monologist. He is best known as a big wall climber, having scaled Yosemite's El Capitan 30+ times, including five solo ascents, and two one day ascents, as well as climbing in Patagonia, Africa, Alaska, Antarctica and the Alps.

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