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Andy Kirkpatrick

25 January 2017

The Old Lie

People keep asking me how our Psychovertical film is coming along, well the Yosemite stuff is in the can, and I hear the team did a great job.  Next month, while I’m over on the UK to do a talk (7th Feb) in Bristol to raise money for the Youth Adventure Trust we’ll do the UK filming, working in Hull, mid Wales and the Peaks.

Talking over our plans the topic of workmanlike creative work, and real artisan work, were everything is put into something, came up, the question being why do people try so hard while others don’t.  I’ve met a lot of people where what they do is just a job, as well as some who it’s life itself, and I think I once said to Al Humphrey’s something along the lines of:

‘If you have to be paid to do your work it’s a job,
if you’d do work for free it’s a passion,
if your work costs you money it’s more than life itself”.

I’m not sure if that’s true, but you get the idea.  Anyway one reason I want to work with Jen and her husband Alex is that they’re not work-a-day, they worry and stress and suffer for what they do.  They forgo security and that nice nine to five life in order to be where they want to be, a healthy bank of work worth being proud of, rather than a bank balance they would make their parents not worry so much.

And so I thought I’d stick one of Jen’s films up for people to watch, to see what art can look like.  This is a short project she did with a bunch of kids from Glasgow. 

While on the subject, I did a long interview on books over on UKC this week, which led to some interesting comments (and responses)  at the bottom.  One thing that came up was about making a difference (I said that the woman’s march was pointless, that all that action was ultimately - although a good day out - a waste of time).  I think too often people are looking at trying to do good in far off places, where often the value is negligible, when there is much to be done closer to home.  Jen’s film made me think about years of talking at schools, and how coming back maybe five years later kids who’d been at primary level had remembered my visit.  I wonder what changes Jen’s film made in the lives of these kids?

Note: Children were only slightly harmed making this film!


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