Skip to main content

Andy Kirkpatrick


training diary

Daily updated training info + stuff #AKtraining

16 January 2017

Monday, so back on it. Legs actually feeling quite tired as had a biggish day on ‘Lug’, on Saturday, which is more of a big boggy hill than a mountain, but still a good walk. Been up it loads of times (it was my first Irish mountain), and I guess I’ve got a bit casual about it. Although there was snow on the ground I took a tiny pack with me up the hill, with just my belay jacket, head torch and ,map/compass, wearing a pull on shell and just my Montane Alpine Stretch pants, and just my running shoes. I knew it would be wet and snowing, but I guess I thought we’d be going fast so I’d be OK (still don’t have a pair of walking boots!). Speed turned up to be quite important, as, as usual, it was about midday by the time we got to the car park, met as usual by parties coming back after an early start.

The winter snow had thinned down a bit with a thaw, the hill not so far from the sea, the ground very boggy under the snow, so it wasn’t long until my feet were wet, but with thick socks they were OK. After about an hour we we’re up on the ridge in a claggy whiteout working off the compass (Lug’s a very easy mountain to get lost on, and can be pretty dangerous as you’ve got big broad slopes with big cliffs on many sides). The wind really picked up, forcing heads behind the edges of hoods, then the rain came, well a heavy wind blown drizzly, soaking my legs (Vanessa had my waterproof pants on, and I began to feel envious as her preparedness). By the time we reached the summit my bottom half was seriously cold, but my top was fine once I pulled on my belay jacket, Vanessa stripped down to nothing on her top in order to switch into dry layers for the way down. I often think that Vanessa makes the mistake that many people do, in that they overdress on the way up, getting too hot and sweaty, then are drenched and cold on the way down. In this case I had a think wool thermal and lightweight power grid fleece (Barrier Micro Pull-On) and my shell, which works well if moving at a good pace. Vanessa had a light thermal top and then a pretty heavy weight Patagonia fleece, which meant she was never quite right. Another error that keeps coming up is that were as I just carry one very thick belay jacket (a Montane Spitfire, BTW this is not a big plug for Montane, just that people like to know what kit is being talked about), which I’d call my survival layer), she carries a thin belay jacket, a thin down jacket, down gilet, and spare thermal top, which sounds good but they’re not robust survival layers (down does not work well for active layering), but worst of all they all fit very snuggly, meaning on the summit her synthetic belay jacket (it’s actually too thin, bit is synthetic) didn’t fit over everything else.

Anyway I digress. After a drink of tea my legs were seriously cold, so I took a baring and we launched into the clag. Now maybe it was that I was using an Irish map, and it confused me, or that I was much colder than I realised (cold can really effect thought processing, but at the brain function level, but also due to creating pressure/panic to escape it), or I was just being a twat… but we launched down the wrong side of the mountain. Just as I described in my Nav Paranoia article, almost straight away my spider senses were tingling: the wind was in our faces when it should be on our left side. The ground had a few features that shouted that we were going wrong somehow, but which my better judgement overruled. But of course I had the compass and map, so used that, but for some reason I’d forgotten just how to use it, well not 100% forgotten, just enough to know I couldn’t trust what I thought was a thumbs up signal. Down we went further, to some rocks, with footsteps leading down in the snow, and again I hesitated. By now Vanessa was telling we she thought we were going wrong, but me being the more experienced, dominated the moment (not a good thing). In my mind I was visualising myself finding some landmark to prove I was right (as had happened many times before), so said we should keep going. "We should walk back up to the summit" suggested Vanessa, but by now I was so cold, my feet seriously cold, that the idea wasn’t worth thinking about. I could feel that although my top half was very warm, my legs and feet were like blocks of ice, and I had seriously fucked up. We went on another ten metres, then got the map out yet again. "You’ve got the map upside down" said Vanessa "the North is at the top, not the bottom". The penny dropped. I handed the map to her and we walked back to the summit, then she lead us down the right way.

It was a nice reminder to not take anything fro granted in the hills (big or small), but I felt wasted on Sunday, but dragged myself down to the climbing wall, and although I did ten routes I felt the tank was empty on anything too hard (after last week training my legs still feel tired, especially my calves).

So today, made it to the gym early and did a 10km run then some upper body weights.

The Day's Training

  • 10km run (57min)
  • 5x5x60kg Bench medium grip = 1500kg
  • 5x5x40kg Bench wide grip = 1000kg
  • 5x5x40kg Bench narrow grip = 1000kg
  • 5x5x50kg Standing Military Press = 1250kg

Note:These numbers don't include warm up, which tend to be done at 25%, 50% and 75% of final weigh.

Notes

Good session considering I’m not feeling fresh, and running body seems to be getting into step, getting the speed up. As for weights, I was short 500kg of lifting (my maths is crap I guess), so maybe I should aim to start making up the shortfall the next day (let's imagine total weight lifted a week is 25000kg!)

Day's Training

  • 10km run (57min)
  • 5x5x60kg Bench medium grip = 1500kg
  • 5x5x40kg Bench wide grip = 1000kg
  • 5x5x40kg Bench narrow grip = 1000kg
  • 5x5x50kg Standing Military Press = 1250kg

Note:These numbers don't include warm up, which tend to be done at 25%, 50% and 75% of final weigh.